January 2008 Entries

Enterprise Library - version 4...

It looks like MS is working on Enterprise Library version 4.0. From what I can tell, version 4 should be very cool. Check out the backlog for version 4. (Yes I did say backlog... They use agile methods in the Patterns and Practices group.)

posted @ Wednesday, January 30, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Spring.NET - My first project...

Yesterday, I created my first UI using the Spring.NET framework. I have to say that I am very impressed! The features I used were - Dependency injection - Model-view-controller support - Two way databinding I have a couple pages done and so far they are turning out to be conceptually simple and clean. The framework strikes the right balance between being too intrusive vs not helpful enough. I am able to use the features that I want, without having to "drink all the cool-aid" at once. The two way databinding is really nice because it decouples the UI stuff, the databinding, and the UI business...

posted @ Wednesday, January 30, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Being in the user's shoes...

This past weekend was my son's cub scout pinewood derby race. I was point person on the committee that organized the event. My main task happened to be running the score board which was written in Excel. I found it quite interesting to be in a position where I was very dependent on the computer and the excel based "application" that we used to run the scores. The thing that surprised me was how nervous I was about the score board working right. The race was a points race with a specially organized set of pairings that rotated the races in such...

posted @ Sunday, January 27, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Model-View-Controller for the web

Over the past couple days, I've been exploring some of the popular open source application frameworks out there. The ones that caught my attention were Spring.NET, MonoRail, and ASP.NET MVC.   All of these offer a nice way to implement web applications using the Model-View-Controller pattern. This pattern helps to separate the UI into it's logical pieces. Once implemented, it becomes much simpler to make powerful UIs with multiple views into the same information.   For an example of MVC, think of MS Word or MS Outlook. They can show you many different "views" of the same data. All of the views...

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP)

Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP) is a term I've stumbled across a couple times before. My 2-second understanding of it was basically that you use attributes in your code to define how the code should behave. These attributes could do things like wrap the method in a transaction or log information about the method call.   So what's the big deal about attributes? We already do that all over the place in .NET as we write web services, etc.   Well, I stumbled on a framework called Spring.NET and read up on it. For some background... Spring.NET is a "spiritual port" of the widely used...

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Inversion of Control and Dependency Injection

As mentioned in my post on AOP, I've been learning more about Inversion of Control (IoC) and Dependencey Injection (DI). I'll explain my take on these a bit more in this post.   IOC and DI have been gaining ground lately in a number of areas. Microsoft built the widely accepted Enterprise Library and the Composite UI Application block on top of an IoC library that they call Object Builder. They chose this design because it gives them a very powerful way to manage a large number of dependencies in these highly-integrated frameworks.   For example, in Enterprise Library, the Exception block...

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Microsoft releases free service virtualization and governance tool

Awesome!!!   Microsoft has released a tool that they developed inside their consulting division. They created the tool to help their customers and now they are starting to make it more widely available.   The Microsoft Services Engine is a runtime that helps manage, version and govern a portfolio of SOA services.   The version they released is version 6.2, which indicates that it's already been through the paces of real-world use. It comes with decent documentation, a management UI, a universal service tester, and the runtime that hosts the virtual services.   It's built on WCF and has a deep understanding of how WCF works. This...

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

Updated Guidance Packages - Very cool!

Just a quick note here, but MS has released updates to some of their guidance packages. The updates look very compelling.   It also sounds like the guidance package framework (GAX and GAT) are going to become an integrated part of the next verison of Visual Studio. This is also very good news.   Most of these are hosted on CodePlex, with supporting pages on MSDN.   Web Service Software Factory (Modeling Edition) Very cool! They used the DSL (Domain Specific Language) toolkit to create a visual designer for creating web services. It looks a little like the class designer in VS 2005.    They also stripped out the data access stuff. This...

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

31 Demos....

Doug Backus says to check this out: http://blogs.msdn.com/nigel/archive/2008/01/24/it-took-me-four-months-but-here-it-is-thirty-one-demos-in-thirty-nine-minutes.aspx

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (0)

ESB vs. Event Driven Architecture (EDA)

I've learned about a new design pattern that is conceptually similar to an ESB. It's called an Event Driven Architecture or EDA. I like this term because it describes the pattern that I've been trying to implement here at IMC via our Service Bus implementations. I still think that an ESB is useful, but the industry seems to be converging on the concept that an ESB is something sort of like BizTalk with it's transformation and orchestration capabilities. EDA can be implemented on top of an ESB of this definition, but it does not require that much power to work right. Microsoft actually...

posted @ Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (1)

Welcome!

Thanks for stopping by my blog! Glad you're here! I hope to share my experiences, lessons, and ideas on the important parts of my life... Family Software Development, Architecture and Engineering Cub Scouts Cycling

posted @ Wednesday, January 23, 2008 12:00 AM | Feedback (1)